Download National Braai Day song

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Free download of the song by Heuwels, JR, HHP and Soweto Gospel Choir

How to braai the perfect steak

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Comprehensive step by step instruction and recipe on how to braai perfect steak – by Jan Braai.

What is Chisa Nyama?

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What is Chisa Nyama? What is Chesa Nyama? What is Shisa Nyama?

lEG Of VENISON IN PORT

Leg of venison in Port

Venison goes very well with sweeter ingredients like dried fruit and port. Instead of trying to choose between the two, I like to just add both. This creates a truly legendary dish with a cut of meat that can otherwise be difficult to cook and which can easily end up dry.

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 8)
Stage 1:
2 kg leg of venison (bone in – make sure it will fit into your potjie, otherwise ask your butcher to cut it into two pieces)
½ tot ground coriander
1 tot chopped rosemary
5 whole cloves
1 whole cinnamon stick
3 bay leaves
1 bottle port
about 10–12 garlic cloves (whole)

Stage 2:
2 tots oil
2 onions (chopped)
1 packet bacon (chopped)
3 carrots (peeled and sliced)
250 g mixed dried fruit (apricots, apples, prunes, etc.)
2 tots lemon juice
2 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper

WHAT TO DO
Stage 1:
1. Mix the coriander, rosemary, cloves, cinnamon stick, bay leaves, port and garlic in a bowl.
2. Now let the meat and marinade join forces either in a large marinating bowl (plastic, glass or ceramic) or a plastic bag. Cover the bowl or seal the bag and let it marinate in a fridge for 2 days. Turn the meat roughly every 8–12 hours.
Stage 2:
1. Take the meat out of the fridge an hour before you start cooking.
2. While the potjie heats up over your fire, take the meat out of the marinade and quickly ‘flame-grill’ it over very hot flames for about
3 minutes a side to give it a nice colour (don’t throw the marinade away; keep it for later). Take the meat off the fire and keep it out the way of hyenas, dogs, etc. 3. Over a hot fire, heat the oil in the potjie and fry the onions and bacon for a few minutes until the onions are soft and start to brown.
4. Put the browned meat inside the potjie, and then add all the marinade left in your marinating bowl or bag. Heat up till the sauce starts simmering, then cover with the lid and cook over a low fire for 2 hours. It should just be a slow simmer.
5. If prunes are one of the dried fruits you want to add, now is the time to pit them if they don’t come that way in the packet. Otherwise it’s a broken tooth waiting to happen and that’s no fun when you’re camping in the bush.
6. After 2 hours of simmering, add the carrots, dried fruit, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and then simmer for a further 1 hour (covered). Keep the temperature low and steady. Add a bit of water only if the pot looks too dry.
7. By now the meat should be really tender. Lift the meat out of the pot onto a wooden carving board and slice into thick chunks – it should just about fall apart by itself.
8. Put the meat chunks back in the pot and stir them carefully into the sauce. Add more salt if necessary. Serve with mashed potatoes. It will be great – end of story.

AND …
If you want more sauce in your pot after carving the meat into chunks (before adding the meat back into the pot), just add a cup of beef stock to the sauce in the pot and bring it to the boil. Boil for about 2 minutes, then thicken slightly with some dissolved cornflour if necessary (mix half a tot each of cornflour and water, see instructions at the bottm of page 124). Stir and bring to a simmer, then add the meat to the sauce and serve.

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MONTAGU CHICKEN POTJIE

Montegu3This is a fantastic potjie recipe for a number of reasons. Most importantly, it yields a great, rich and exotic meal but equally important is the fact that you can find every single ingredient in almost any supermarket in South African cities, suburbs and the platteland. In Montagu, the picturesque town in the Klein Karoo, you can find all the core ingredients on every streetcorner. There is absolutely no preparation necessary here and once you’ve lit your fire, the food can be served within one and a half hours.

WHAT YOU NEED
(feeds 4)
8 chicken pieces (thighs and drumsticks, preferably without skin)
2 tots olive oil
1 onion (chopped)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
2 garlic cloves (crushed)
fresh ginger, equal in volume to the garlic (grated)
1 tot ground cumin
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 cup chicken or vegetable stock
1 cup orange juice
1 cup soft dried prunes (stones removed)
½ cup dried apricots

TO SERVE
2 cups couscous
2 cups boiling water
2 tots butter
1 tsp salt
2 spring onions (chopped)
1 tot mint (freshly chopped)
1 cup almonds

WHAT TO DO
1. Make a big fire and position your potjie on the flames.
2. Dry-roast the cup of almonds for about 1 minute. Pay lots of attention – they will burn quickly. Remove from the potjie and set aside for much later. At some stage during the party, you need to roughly chop these roasted almonds. 3. It really makes the potjie nicer if you take some or all of the skins off the chicken pieces. This is a simple process: use clean hands and pull the skin off the chicken. Now add the olive oil, chicken pieces and chopped onion to the potjie. 4. Then sprinkle the salt and pepper over the stuff in the potjie, which needs to be on the fire. Use your wooden spoon to toss things around, then fry for a few minutes until the chicken starts to brown and the onions are soft.
5. Add the garlic, ginger, cumin, turmeric and cinnamon and fry for 1 minute to unlock the flavours of the spices. Rapidly proceed to the next step before the spices burn.
6. Add the stock and orange juice and use the liquid to scrape loose anything from the bottom of the potjie that is trying to get stuck and burn.
7. Also add the prunes and apricots. Toss everything, put the lid on the potjie and let it gently simmer for 45 minutes with some coals or the odd flame under the potjie.
8. During the 45 minutes of cooking the potjie, prepare the couscous. Put the couscous in a bowl and pour the boiling water onto that. Cover and let it stand for 5 minutes and then add the butter to it. Now use a fork to flake the couscous and stir in the salt, chopped spring onion, mint and chopped almonds.
9. After 45 minutes, remove the potjie lid and gently stir so as not to break the chicken. Now let the potjie simmer uncovered for a good while until you are happy with the consistency of the sauce. Total cooking time from frying the chicken and onions should not be more than 90 minutes. You want the sauce to thicken but don’t let it completely cook away. You want the thickened sauce to drench the couscous – that’s part of the appeal of the meal.
10. Serve the chicken on a generous bed of couscous.

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Mieliepaptert

Screen Shot 2018-07-18 at 5.14.31 PMIn a world of uncertainty, I have never been disappointed by mieliepaptert. It’s an almost foolproof dish. You start off by making mieliepap, already a great meal on its own. Then you just add some bells and whistles to make it even better – almost like buying a great new car and then adding all the optional extras. Assembling the mieliepaptert in layers is essentially like making a lasagne, just with entirely different ingredients.

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 8)

For the stywepap:

  • 3 cups water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 cups maize meal

For the mieliepaptert:

  • 2 tots olive oil
  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 1 packet (200–250 g) smoked streaky bacon (sliced into chunks)
  • 400–500 g mushrooms (sliced)
  • 1?2 tsp salt (the bacon is already salty)
  • 1?2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 can creamed sweet corn
  • 2 cups grated Cheddar cheese (about 200 g)
  • 2 cups cream (2 × 250 ml tubs)
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme

WHAT TO DO

Make the stywepap:

  1. Add the water and the salt to a pot and get the water boiling over a hot fire (or stove).
  2. When the water in the pot boils, stir in the maize meal using a wooden spoon. It should take you between 1 and 2 minutes to mix it in properly.
  3. Put the lid on the pot and let it simmer for 25 minutes on very low heat. On a fire, this means removing the pot from the flames and placing it on a few coals.
  4. You can check on the porridge (or pap) once or twice during this time to make sure it’s simmering (boiling is too hot; standing still is too cold), but don’t lift the lid too often as too much water will then escape in the form of steam. After 25 minutes the porridge will be ready.
  5. You can now enjoy the porridge as is, but to use it in mieliepaptert you need to take it off the fire and let it cool down in the pot – we’re looking for a solid piece of pap that we can slice.

Make the mieliepaptert:

  1. Take the cooled stywepap out of the pot in one piece, and cut into 1 cm-thick slices, as you would do with bread.
  2. Put the pot back on the fire. Add the oil, onion, bacon and mushrooms. Fry for about 10 minutes until the onion turns a golden brown colour. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Take the pot o the heat and pour the contents into a bowl. In the empty pot, start layering the paptert with a layer of sliced pap (place a few slices of pap loosely next to each other, but not too tightly). Follow with a layer of onion/bacon/mushrooms, a few spoonfuls of sweet corn and some grated Cheddar. Then another layer of pap, and so on. You should have about 2–3 layers (but this is not an exact science) of each, finishing with some cheese.
  4. Pour the cream over the top layer (it will sink in), and finish with some thyme leaves.
  5. Put the lid back on. Put the pot over some coals (not too hot) and also put some hot coals on top of the lid. Cook for 30 minutes until the meal is simmering and the cheese is nice and brown. The cream sauce will thicken on standing, so leave it to rest for 10–15 minutes before serving.
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BREAKFAST PIZZA

breakfastpizza2Looks like a pizza, made on a wood fire, more of a frittata and a real breakfast winner! This is not really a pizza and probably closer to an Italian frittata, but the name is catchy and from a distance it looks like a pizza. The quantities here make both shopping and execution of the recipe easy. As you might imagine, when you’ve done it once, this is a recipe you can use as a baseline for your own further experimentation with ingredients.

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 6)

  • 1 packet (200 g) bacon (chopped)
  • 2 bell peppers (any combination of green, yellow or red, seeded and chopped)
  • 1 large onion (chopped)
  • 2 large tomatoes (chopped)
  • 1 tot chutney
  • 6 eggs (beaten)
  • 1 tot milk
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • roughly 200 g Cheddar cheese (grated)
  • fire-toasted bread or roosterkoek (to serve)

WHAT TO DO

  1. In a pan on the fire, fry the bacon pieces for a few minutes and then add the chopped bell peppers and onion. Fry all of these together on high heat until things start to brown. Add some oil or butter if things look like they might burn before they get to the golden-brown goal.
  2. Now add the tomatoes and chutney and toss everything around for another few minutes until your mixture is well and truly stir-fried.
  3. In rapid succession, add all of the eggs and milk, as well as the salt, pepper and oregano to the pan. Mix everything together so the egg mixture can fill the gaps between the rest of the ingredients and form a nice layer on top.
  4. When things are evened out to your liking, top the eggs with all of the cheese and then close the pan with tight-fitting tinfoil. Let the pan stand over gentle heat for a few minutes until the egg is cooked and the cheese melted.
  5. Serve with fire-toasted bread or freshly baked roosterkoek.

AND …
The bacon can be swapped or supplemented with finely chopped leftover braai meat. On the cheesy side, the Cheddar cheese can be supplemented or swapped with crumbled feta cheese.

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CURRIED SWEET POTATO AND CARROT SOUP

Sweet potato&Curry soupA potjie and a fire do a great job when it comes to cooking soup. This fail-safe recipe results in a soup that works very well as an impressive starter to a three-course braaied meal. The special piece of equipment I have to make this recipe particularly successful is a cordless stick blender. Once all the contents of the potjie are cooked, you use the blender to transform the lumps into a smooth soup right there on the fire. Alternatively, just use a traditional potato masher for a soup with a slightly different texture but equally great taste.

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 8)

  • 2 tots olive oil
  • 1 onion (chopped)
  • 1 tot ginger (piece of about 5 cm, freshly grated)
  • 2 garlic cloves (chopped)
  • 1 tot medium curry powder
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 2 medium-sized sweet potatoes (peeled and cut into blocks)
  • 4 large carrots (peeled and cut into chunks)
  • 2 cups good-quality chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 lemon (juice)
  • 1 tot fresh coriander (chopped)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tub sour cream (or crème fraîche)

WHAT TO DO
1. Heat the oil in a potjie on the fire and fry the onion for 4 minutes. Add the ginger and garlic and fry for another minute.
2. Add all the spices and fry for about 1 minute until it starts smelling amazing.
3. Now stir in the sweet potato and carrot, making sure everything is mixed well with the spices.
4. Add the stock and water, bring to a gentle boil, and close the lid of the potjie. Simmer for about 45 minutes until everything is cooked and completely soft. You can check up on the potjie now and then just to make sure it’s not running dry but this is very unlikely. As usual, if it does happen, add more water.
5. Once everything is cooked through and soft, remove the lid and use your stick blender or masher to transform the contents of the potjie into a soup of uniform consistency. If the soup is too thick, add some water.
6. Stir in the lemon juice and coriander. Taste and season with salt and pepper.
7. Dish up with a big dollop of sour cream or crème fraîche in each bowl and serve with fresh bread toasted on the fire.

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